RESEARCH

MAKING PLANTS FOR THE FUTURE

At Best Buds, we get excited when we discover new plant species which are non-commercialised or hard to find . 
Even though we like the "hunt" for those rare species, we prefer to be on the pioneering side and take it one step further.

In plant technology, numerous techniques have allowed the world to benefit from higher yielding, better resistant, more colorful or tasteful plants and fruits.
These techniques have been used mainly to steer agricultural crop development, whilst horticultural plants have been bred and hybridised in a more traditional fashion.

In partnering with Bombi Biomics, a Belgian based plant technology company, Best Buds wants to be on the frontier of developing new commercial plant hybrids, fit for the current market.
With a background in bio-engineering, e-commerce and urban plant collecting, we feel well positioned to take on this challenge.

How will this work?

Besides traditional hybridisation, in which you fertilise one plant with the pollen of a (closely related) other plant of a different species; there is a wide array of plant breeding techniques we can use to steer plant variation. 


We can help this hybridisation process by taking away bio-physical barriers that prevent plants from forming hybrid crosses in nature. Those barriers can be either geo-locational (one plant grows in an area far removed from another), physical (the plants are pollinated by different insects e.g.), practical (plants flower at different moments) or biochemical (there is a genetic barrier which prevents plants from cross breeding).


When plants cells are stripped from their cell wall (creating plant protoplasts), we can fuse two cells using a chemical glue to create a hybrid cell containing material of both plants. 

After hybridisation, we can select successful hybridised cells and grow them to become plants, which can be selected for aesthetic features.


Other options include mutation breeding. 


With the use of mutation breeding new and exciting possibilities for new variations in your breeding program become accessible. It is possible to create unique flower colours and new flower formation, compact plants, new and exciting leaf shapes and colours. Gamma irradiation induces mutations in the plant genome which results in new phenotypes. Inducing mutation is actually speeding up a natural process to create new varieties, because you don’t need to wait for spontaneous mutations.


During the mutation, breeding plants are exposed to a defined dose of gamma irradiation, which creates e.g. new flower colours and shapes. Gamma irradiation are high energy short waves, and it is this energy which induces changes in the plant DNA. Irradiation is only active during the treatment and is not harmful for people or the environment after treatment.


The use of gamma irradiation can substitute the application of chemicals and thereby reduce the risk of work accidents. 


We use protoplast and cytoplast systems for our precision breeding technologies which results in non-GM plants.

our future plant stars

Our research will focus on different plant species and genera within the Aroid family. The plants shown below present a glimpse of what might be possible with focused breading and selecting techniques, yet the outcome of our research is unknown to anyone involved.

This is a mock-up. This beauty is currently in research.

Miss piggy

monstera variegata 'miss piggy'

Miss Piggy is a variegated Monstera deliciosa. Its unique pink variegation was designed for all the plant collectors that love a pink splash in their green home jungle.


Just like the white variegated nephews and non-variegated grandparents, it's a medium levelled maintenance house plant which requires a fair amount of light and water and enjoys high humidity.

This is a mock-up. This beauty is currently in research.

glinda

Alocasia Maccrorhiza 'Glinda'

Alocasia 'Glinda' is a unique pink variegated Alocasia, I bet you've never seen anything like it before?


A. Glinda is quite thirsty and likes a lot of light (no direct light though). To keep the leaves optimal, it's best to keep the environment sufficiently humid.

kirby

anthurium clarinervium 'kirby'

Kirby is an Anthurium clarinervium with pink veins. With its pink stripes, it forms a unique leaf pattern.


It's rather easy in maintenance as it requires medium to low light and requires watering once a week. It does enjoy high humidity.

This is a mock-up. This beauty is currently in research.

This is a mock-up. This beauty is currently in research.

kirby

ANTHURIUM CLARINERVIUM 'KIRBY'

Kirby is an anthurium Clarinervium with pink veins. With its pink stripes, it forms a unique leaf pattern.


Like most current Anthuriums, it's rather easy in maintenance as it requires medium to low light and requires watering once a week. It does enjoy high humidity.


The Clarinervium Kirby is currently in research phase, if you want to help in the research and pre-order so you are amongst the first to adopt me your Anthurium Kirby, go check the crowdfunding (below).

crowdfunding

We start our crowdfunding soon, if you want to stay up-to-date of the launch of our crowdfunding, please subscribe to our newsletter.

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